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Posts tagged “chives

福建炒蝦麵- Fried Hokkien Prawn Noodles

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Mention Singapore hawker fare and many familiar dishes come to mind. Char Kway Teow, Chye Tow Kueh, Laksa, Bak Chor Mee are just some of the familiar favorites which any true blue Singaporean would be more than glad to indulge in whenever the opportunity avails. A dish which I truly love and enjoy immensely is Char Hae Mee, which is also known as Fried Hokkien Prawn Noodles. And here is my humble attempt to recreate this much-loved noodle dish at home.

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배추김치 Baechu-kimchi – Korean Cabbage Kimchi

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If every country has their own “national dish”, Kimchi must surely be Korea’s. This spicy pickled Napa cabbage is so immensely popular, it is almost synonymously linked to Korean food culture. Its versatility deems it not only good to be eaten on its own, but also cooked in a large variety of ways from soups like kimchi jijae or kimchiguk, to kimchi fried rice (kimchi bokkeumbap) as well as flavouring the base of hotpots like dubu kimchi jeongol. Its versatility also means that it is eaten is in practically every Korean meal, be it casual street food on the go where one would find kimchi pancakes (kimchijeon), to very formal royal meals like the Susarang. Even if it is not eaten on its own, the paste for making kimchi is used as a dipping sauce, from hotpots to live octopuses!

In Korea, kimchi comes in a large variety of forms. From the spicy version which evokes the liberal use of chilli pepper powder to the non-spicy and thus milder versions like the “water kimchi“. A large variety of ingredients are also used for pickling from white radish to cucumber but by far, the most popular and thus most common form of kimchi is made from Napa cabbage which the Koreans call baechu, giving rise 배추김치 Baechu-kimchi, that is Korean Cabbage Kimchi.

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ผัดไทย Pad Thai and A Short Review on David Thompson’s “Thai Street Food”

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One of my earliest experience with Thai food is probably Pad Thai, together with the other quintessential “must-orders” for anyone venturing into Thai cuisine, like Tom Yum Goong and Pineapple Fried Rice. Every street hawker does Pad Thai a bit differently from the other. Slight nuances in the ingredients used, the proportion of condiments, even down to the sequence of adding the ingredients, e.g. when to crack the egg etc. could alter the taste and texture of the dish completely. But they are all quite delicious. Well, most of them are at least. To date, this popular street food which brings together three important ingredients commonly used in Thai cooking, i.e. palm sugar, tamarind pulp and fish sauce, remains one of my favorites, being sweet, sour and savory all at the same time.
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麥文記麵家 Mak Man Kee Noodle Shop @ Hong Kong

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I remember eating at 麥文記麵家 Mak Man Kee Noodle Shop once many years back and it was seriously good. But in Hong Kong, one is literally spoilt for choices when it comes to wantan mee. Noodle shops selling wantan mee can be found practically every other street! But when it comes to getting to know the “reputably good”, one must mention the 香港5大雲吞麺家  “Wantan Mee Famous Five” in Hong Kong,  麥奀雲吞麺家 “Mak An Kee” in Sheung Wan, 麥奀記 (忠記) 麵家 “Mak An Chung Kee” Noodle in Central, 麥文記麵家 “Mak Man Kee” in Jordan, 何洪記 “Hung Man Kee” in Causeway Bay, 正斗 “Tasty Congee and Noodles” in Happy Valley. Their roots can be traced back to the original 池記 “Chee Kee” in Guangzhou China, where all of the “founders” of Famous Five apprenticed. Since then, they have been highly regarded and held as the benchmark of wantan mee in Hong Kong. But are they really that good?

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